Blackjack Expert Mike Aponte Teaches You to Count Cards

Want to learn how to beat the casino in blackjack? If so, then a good place to start is with Mike Aponte, a World Series of Blackjack champion and former member of the infamous MIT Blackjack Team. Aponte and the rest of the MIT squad burned casinos for millions of dollars in the 1990s. And […]

mike-aponte-blackjackWant to learn how to beat the casino in blackjack? If so, then a good place to start is with Mike Aponte, a World Series of Blackjack champion and former member of the infamous MIT Blackjack Team.

Aponte and the rest of the MIT squad burned casinos for millions of dollars in the 1990s. And what’s cool is that much of the same advice still applies today.

“The card counting system that I recommend is called the Hi-Lo,” says Aponte. “We have the high cards – 10, jack, queen, king, and ace – and these are good for the player. But they have a count value of minus-one each because as high cards are depleted from the game, the player advantage goes down.”

Basically, you don’t want to see too many high cards dealt, instead hoping that they remain in the shoe so they can help you out later.

“The next group of cards is the low cards – 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 – and these cards are good for the dealer,” Aponte explains. “So naturally, these are going to have a count value of +1 [when you see them dealt]. Because as these low cards are depleted, that means there’s fewer of them that can hurt you in future play.”

The last group of cards that Aponte discusses are the neutral group.

“These cards don’t have a count value at all because they don’t favor the house or the player.”

As you can see in the video below, Aponte goes through some quick examples of what the count would be as hands are dealt.

Aponte makes card counting look easy. But if you want to be as good as him, the next step is to practice keeping the count in real-time game conditions. You also have to know how to spread your bets when the count is in your favor, while simultaneously avoiding casino detection.

 

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