Research Shows Blackjack Popularity has Plummeted since 1987

Blackjack is an interesting game because it has a low house edge and stimulating strategy. But according to a recent report by UNLV’s Center for Gaming Research, blackjack isn’t stimulating enough these days. Their research shows that blackjack popularity has spiraled downward over the past three decades. In fact, blackjack has lost 25% of its […]

blackjack-mythsBlackjack is an interesting game because it has a low house edge and stimulating strategy. But according to a recent report by UNLV’s Center for Gaming Research, blackjack isn’t stimulating enough these days.

Their research shows that blackjack popularity has spiraled downward over the past three decades.

In fact, blackjack has lost 25% of its play since 1987 – the largest drop among any table game in the world.

What’s the Reason for Blackjack’s Dramatic Fall?

casino-blackjack-house-edge-1Back in the 1980s, blackjack tables were highly popular in both Atlantic City and Las Vegas. For one thing, players loved using strategy to try and beat the house. People also enjoyed trying their hand at card counting, even if they were ultimately unsuccessful.

Even today, blackjack has many fans in these America casino destinations. But the UNLV Center for Gaming Research believes that blackjack has been hurt by the growth of Macau and Singapore – two destinations where players favor mini baccarat above all.

Another problem is that more people are playing at online casinos like Drake Casino. This makes it possible that people didn’t suddenly start disliking blackjack, but rather the land-based players are shifting towards the internet.

Other Table Games are Still Popular

mini-baccaratBlackjack may not be doing as well in land-based casinos today. But baccarat has experienced a major surge in brick-and-mortar casinos – nearly quadrupling its play since 2005.

This makes sense because the increase of mini baccarat tables has made the game more affordable for low-stakes players.

Roulette has also seen its appeal increase, moving from a 6.6% share of table-game revenue to over 10% in 2016.

What’s in Store for Blackjack’s Future?

Despite losing some popularity, blackjack still holds 51% of the table-game revenue share. In comparison, craps was a distant second at 11%. But this is a far cry from the 76% share that blackjack held in 1987.

With online play increasing, the slide for land-based blackjack will continue. In the meantime, more blackjack players will be gravitating towards online casinos.

 

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