Card Counter Booted from WSOP – Now He’s Suing

Last year, poker pro Joseph Stiers was poised to make a deep run in the 2017 WSOP Main Event. He had 660,000 chips and was in the top 10 of the leaderboard. But on Day 3 of the event, Rio security grabbed him, handcuffed him, and kicked Stiers out of the casino. Their reasoning: card […]

Last year, poker pro Joseph Stiers was poised to make a deep run in the 2017 WSOP Main Event. He had 660,000 chips and was in the top 10 of the leaderboard.

But on Day 3 of the event, Rio security grabbed him, handcuffed him, and kicked Stiers out of the casino.

Their reasoning: card counting.

Stiers was caught four years ago counting cards at the Horseshoe Baltimore by Caesars Interactive Entertainment (Rio’s and WSOP’s parent company). And the worst part for Stiers is that he didn’t receive his $10,000 Main Event buy-in back.

Now he’s looking for revenge and is suing Caesars Interactive. Keep reading to find out more on this story along with if the poker pro/card counter has a chance.

Stiers Wants Equity from His Chip Stack and the $10k Buy-in

It’s no surprise that Stiers is seeking to recover his $10k buy-in. However, he also believes that he’s entitled to “equitable and injunctive relief” as well as punitive damages.

Going further, Stiers argues that being kicked out of the tournament and not receiving his buy-in back ruined his bankroll.

“Caesars/WSOP had always accepted my money and retained my money when I was losing poker tournaments, which totaled to over $200,000,” his court papers read.

“But only enforced this trespass eviction during a tournament when I was in a position to win up to $8 million and had around $150,000 in current chip equity.”

Stiers Used Alias to Enter Previous WSOP Tournaments

One damning part of this case on Stiers’ behalf is that he previously played in WSOP events under an alias. He’s used the name Joseph Conorstiers (combo of middle & last name) to enter tournaments.

Conorstiers placed 640 in the 2016 WSOP Main Event ($18,714), and 828th place in a 2016 WSOP $1,500 NL tournament ($2,511).

Stiers is banned from Caesars Interactive properties. So the fact that he’s using an alias and claiming that his hometown is Washington D.C. (he’s from nearby Maryalnd) doesn’t bode well for his case.

 

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