Irish Casino Avoids Paying out €11k in Winnings

A roulette player named Sayed Mirwais thought that he was entitled to €11,713 in winnings at an Irish casino. But Judge Francis Comerford stated that there’s no legal guarantee that gamblers will be paid winnings. Mirwais told the courtroom that he’d won thousands of euros after placing several large bets on an automated roulette machine. […]

d1-casinoA roulette player named Sayed Mirwais thought that he was entitled to €11,713 in winnings at an Irish casino. But Judge Francis Comerford stated that there’s no legal guarantee that gamblers will be paid winnings.

Mirwais told the courtroom that he’d won thousands of euros after placing several large bets on an automated roulette machine. €7,500 of his winnings came on March 2nd and 3rd, and the casino gave him €2,500 in cash and €5,000 in chips. Officials at Dublin’s D1 Casino told him to go back and keep playing, and he’d receive cash value on the chips at the end of the night.

Mirwais proceeded to win another €6,713, bringing his total unpaid amount to €11,713. A D1 casino manager told him to cash his money out, but the cashier counter told him they had no more cash. The Irish Times reports that they never paid the winnings.

This resulted in a lawsuit, where D1 Casino claimed that they didn’t pay because Mirwais exploited a game flaw. Specifically, they allege he changed the screen layout from single to double play mode, then used a malfunction that let him place bets after the ball settled into a winning pocket.

dublin-irelandMirwais, an Afghan refugee who was a doctor in his home country, said he’d lost €9,000 the previous night in D1 Casino. And he took issue with the fact that D1 only had a problem when he started winning money.

“When I was losing my money, the machine was ok and the casino was happy to take it,” he said, “but when I won, they wanted to investigate.”

In his ruling, Judge Comerford said that gamblers must place a considerable amount of trust in automated machines, given the laws in Ireland. Specifically, the Gaming and Lottery Act 1956 states that “no action shall lie for the recovery of any money or thing which is alleged to be won.”

“If you happen to be too lucky while placing a bet or gambling, the person can simply say ‘no you’re not entitled to the money.’ That is simply the law in Ireland,” said Comerford.

 

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