Macau Interested in Esports

Macau casinos have developed a strong interest in Esports, seeing this as a good way to appeal to another generation of customers. Grand Lisboa Hotel has led this charge, sponsoring the MDL Macau Dota2 International Elite Invitational at the University of Macau. This tournament was dubbed the “the first international e-Sports competition held in Macau.” […]

Macau casinos have developed a strong interest in Esports, seeing this as a good way to appeal to another generation of customers.

Grand Lisboa Hotel has led this charge, sponsoring the MDL Macau Dota2 International Elite Invitational at the University of Macau. This tournament was dubbed the “the first international e-Sports competition held in Macau.”

Ambrose So Shu Fai, the CEO of SJM Holdings, which owns Grand Lisboa, spoke about why his company is so interested in Esports.

“Esports is an emerging industry with huge growth potential and global viewership,” said Ambrose. “Macau is put in the limelight with this major e-Sports tournament, which we believe will further benefit the development of the city’s tourism and leisure business.”

The tourney was a success, drawing nine teams and offering a prize pool worth $300,000. Europe’s OG squad won the tournament, beating the Philippines’ TNC Gaming in the final. This event also drew Brooklyn Nets point guard Jeremy Lin, who was in attendance.

Get Ready for More Esports in Macau

The MDL Macau Dota2 International Elite Invitational may only be the tip of the iceberg as far as Esports go. Galaxy Entertainment Group staged the 2017 China Esports Carnival in August, while Studio City hosted the GIRLGAMER 2017 Esports Festival.

Last month, MGS Entertainment Show featured a number of business presentations that discussed how the casino hub can best use competitive video gaming to attract new customers.

Challenges to Esports in Macau

The biggest roadblock to Esports’ success in Macau is the age gap from those who enjoy competitive video gaming versus older gamblers. But Electronic Sports League founder Ralf Reichert discussed how this is changing.

“People are afraid of what they don’t understand,” Reichert explained. “There is still a generation that doesn’t know anything about video games. Twenty years ago that was a majority, now it’s 50-50, and in the future there will be less people that don’t understand it.”

Assuming Esports can overcome this age gap, then they’re poised for some impressive growth in the near future.

 

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