New Jackie Chan Movie Financed with Unclaimed Gambling Winnings

Jackie Chan released a sci-fi thriller last year called Bleeding Steel. Unfortunately for Chan, the movie was a complete flop. But it has at least produced an interesting gambling related story. The New South Wales government used a program that collects unclaimed gambling winnings in order to help pay for the film’s budget. The money […]

Jackie Chan released a sci-fi thriller last year called Bleeding Steel. Unfortunately for Chan, the movie was a complete flop. But it has at least produced an interesting gambling related story.

The New South Wales government used a program that collects unclaimed gambling winnings in order to help pay for the film’s budget.

The money was supplied by the community development fund via the Office of Responsible Gambling. The office took $850,000 from unclaimed slot machine payouts and used them to help fund Chan’s movie.

Why Did Bleeding Steel Receive Funding from Slots Revenue?

The reason why Bleeding Steel received a large portion of unclaimed slots winnings is because key scenes were filmed in Australia. One scene features Chan fighting a villain at the top of the Sidney Opera House.

According to the Gaming Machines Act 2001, this film qualifies under any “such community benefits as the Secretary considers appropriate” with regard to funding.

$3.34 million was given to 52 projects between 2014 in 2016. Some of these projects include upgrading war memorials throughout New South Wales and improving school facilities. But no project has yet to see the amount that was given to Chan’s movie, which was filmed in 2016.

Liquor and Gaming NSW Defends Decision

Liquor and Gaming NSW, which helps decide who gets unclaimed gambling winnings, has been questioned about giving such a large amount to Chan’s film project.

A spokesman defended the decision by saying that they “undertook a thorough cost benefit analysis” before deciding the film would deliver “significant short and long-term economic and tourism benefits, particularly from Asia”.

The spokesman added, “The project directly injected over $20 million into the NSW economy and employed over 1100 staff, crew, cast and extras in NSW between May and September 2016.”

Greens MLC Justin Field feels that the grant is a “highly unusual use of the Community Development Fund.”

Field added, “This fund is derived from unclaimed gambling winnings. It should be used for genuine community building projects or used to support victims of gambling harm.”

 

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