Phil Ivey Loses $10.2m Baccarat Case in UK Supreme Court

Pro gambler Phil Ivey has lost an appeal worth £7.7 ($10.2m) in the UK Supreme Court. This case dates back to 2012 and involves multiple baccarat sessions that Ivey played at Crockfords casino. He turned his £1 million stake into £7.7 in winnings. Crockfords originally said that they’d wire the money after the bank holiday […]

Pro gambler Phil Ivey has lost an appeal worth £7.7 ($10.2m) in the UK Supreme Court.

This case dates back to 2012 and involves multiple baccarat sessions that Ivey played at Crockfords casino. He turned his £1 million stake into £7.7 in winnings.

Crockfords originally said that they’d wire the money after the bank holiday was over. But Ivey never received his funds because Crockfords felt that he cheated.

The Mayfair, London casino did return Ivey’s original stake. However, they refused to pay the winnings even when threatened with a lawsuit.

The 40-year-old took his case to a London high court to recoup his winnings. But he was denied on the basis that his advantage-play technique, edge sorting, violates UK gambling rules.

Edge sorting involves looking at patterns on card-backs to determine which cards are beneficial. Some might consider this advantage-play and believe that Ivey deserves the winnings. However, after losing his case in three different British courtrooms, it’s clear that the judges don’t agree.

“The game is one of pure chance, with cards delivered entirely at random and unknowable by the punters or the house,” wrote the Supreme Court justices. “What Mr. Ivey did was to stage a carefully planned and executed sting.”

Ivey’s Statement after Losing the Baccarat Case

“At the time I played at Crockfords, I believed that edge-sorting was a legitimate Advantage Play technique and I believe that more passionately than ever today,” Ivey told reporters after the ruling.

“It makes no sense that the U.K. Supreme Court has ruled against me, in my view, contrary to the facts and any possible logic involved in our industry.

“It is because of my sense of honor and respect for the manner in which gambling is undertaken by professional gamblers such as myself that I have pursued this claim for my unpaid winnings.”

Open Case with Atlantic City’s Borgata

Ivey has also been ordered to pay $10.1 million for an edge sorting case with Atlantic City’s Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa.

Ivey is currently appealing this decision too. However, it doesn’t seem like he’ll be too successful based on the UK Supreme Court result.

 

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