Supreme Court Rejects Kelly Sun’s $1.2m Baccarat Case

The US Supreme Court recently tossed a $1.14 million baccarat lawsuit leveled by Cheung Yin Sun. Better known by her Americanized name Kelly Sun, Cheung earned millions of dollars in baccarat profits at Foxwoods and other casinos. In the Foxwoods case, Sun worked with two woman named Zong Yang Li and Long Mei Fang to […]

cheung-yin-sun-baccaratThe US Supreme Court recently tossed a $1.14 million baccarat lawsuit leveled by Cheung Yin Sun.

Better known by her Americanized name Kelly Sun, Cheung earned millions of dollars in baccarat profits at Foxwoods and other casinos. In the Foxwoods case, Sun worked with two woman named Zong Yang Li and Long Mei Fang to win $1.14 million in profits.

But Foxwoods refused to pay because Sun used a technique called edge sorting to win. As we covered before, Sun trained herself to spot small imperfections on card backs to tell what the values would be before they’re flipped over.

Why did the Supreme Court Throw Sun’s Case Out?

A US District Court originally ruled in favor of Foxwoods’ owner, the Mashantucket Pequots. The judge’s reasoning was that Sun and her accomplices can’t sue because the Mashantucket Pequots “have sovereign immunity as an American Indian tribe.”

The US Supreme Court upheld this ruling on the grounds that there was no reason to consider the players’ lawsuit to be valid in a sovereign tribal jurisdiction.

Another Legal Loss for Sun

phil-ivey-kelly-sunKelly Sun first rose to infamy when it was revealed that she and famed poker pro Phil Ivey were edge sorting partners. They won a combined $22 million from the Borgata and Crockfords casino. But only the Borgata actually paid the pair, wiring them $9.6 million.

Crockfords refused to pay the gamblers, and a judge sided with the London casino when Ivey sued them.

Borgata sued to get their $9.6 million back and won the lawsuit. Ivey is currently in the process of appealing both decisions.

As for Sun, it looks like there’s no chance for her to recover the Foxwoods winnings. After all, the owners operate on tribal lands, and two US courts have ruled that the lawsuit is therefore invalid.

 

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